Auberge Val Carroll

Welcome

Auberge Val Carroll, situated in the beautiful lower Laurentians of Quebec, offers a unique opportunity for observing Canadian wildlife in its natural habitat.

Over six hundred acres of woodlands, meadows, lakes, and groomed trails leading one away from the hectic life into peace and tranquility. Our lake is always inviting.

The ten-room Auberge and the five-room guest house, each features private bathrooms, some with whirlpools and refrigerators. For your special event we have facilities on our property where independent chalets accommodate up to an additional 50 guests.

Auberge Val Carroll is situated less than 90 minutes from Montreal or Ottawa and 40 minutes from Mont Tremblant.

Val Carroll property extends to the Rouge River, famous for white-water rafting.

Superb golfing is available at Carling Lake (15 minutes), Arundel (20 minutes) or Mt.Tremblant (40 minutes).

Our unique facilities have hosted many events:  weddings, receptions, reunions, conferences and films. Our seasonal pavilion accommodates up to 80 guests.  We also feature a private, non-denominational Heritage Chapel. This chapel seats 80 guests.

Food, which is the foundation of any good reputation, is expertly presented by our Award Winning Swiss Chef, Josef Oeler. This warm setting, relaxing ambiance and excellent cuisine, is offered at comparative prices. 

Val Carroll’s guest book remains our best Ambassador to fine food, service and warm Hospitality.

Our motto over 20 years continues:  “Arrive as a stranger, leave as a friend”

Contact
Telephone: (819) 242-7041
Fax: (819) 242-5103
Email: info@aubergevalcarroll.com

The birth of Auberge Val Carroll

The history of what eventually would become Auberge Val Carroll is quite interesting. In 1987, the Canadian International Paper Company (CIP) no longer wished to retain eight buildings that belonged to the 4H Club of Harrington. They went on sale as a closed bid. The CIP property was adjacent to Val Carroll property.

As stipulated in the proposed sale, all eight buildings had to be demolished or removed from the site before the year's end. Our bid was accepted in October, meaning only three months remained to dispose of the buildings. Since each of the eight buildings was still structurally sound, we felt that it would be unpardonable to destroy such craftsmanship. However there were enormous problems to resolve. To begin with, the buildings had been built into the mountains, the builders never foreseeing the need to move them. Also over the years large trees had grown around the structures and there was no access road to get to the six smaller units. What to do? The newly proposed home for the buildings, on Val Carroll property, was over a mile away. It was impossible to move the largest of the buildings, measuring 28 feet by 48 feet (8,5 m  x 14,6 m) along municipal roads because of Hydro lines and natural obstructions. To resolve this problem required drastic measures. With the support of the CIP crew with chainsaws and a bulldozer the buildings were freed from the forest and the logging road to the new location was widened.  

All the buildings required jacking to drive a flatbed underneath them. This took several days. Then the actual move began in earnest. It was a cold autumn that year and the creek froze early. Except on the day of the actual move. The weather cleared and while the trucks moved over the creek bed, the trucks with the building began to sink. As the truck began disappearing into the muck desperate action began. The bulldozers were brought back and gradually the flatbed truck was pulled in reverse out of the quagmire. We couldn’t wait for another heavy frost. Trees and rocks had to be dumped into the passage route to continue our adventure. The following morning we were ready to try again. Success! Yet, another two days were required to travel this new road. That we almost lost trucks, drivers, and what would become the auberge, was turned to victory when the Val Carroll property loomed up in our sights. Naturally, any venture of this magnitude is impossible without the support of friends. Mr. Robert Côté, commissioner of Lachute, proceeded to work through the mountains of bureaucratic red tape. Frank Burmeister, who planned, sketched, changed, and eventually helped to create the final product. Pat Downing’s task was to organize the paperwork, which seemed to double every day. Lorraine and Arthur Pond from Ottawa, have given over the years so much of their time, energy and resources. It has not been an easy task building an auberge in the middle of the mountains, but when you have others to share your dream, anything is possible. So many have helped. Each having added important pieces to the puzzle. The creation of Auberge Val Carroll.

The impossible is always possible – it just takes a little while longer.